NÎMES: The Pride of Rome

Posted by on Jun 7, 2015 in Uncategorized | 4 Comments

Nîmes is the home of a number of notable Roman monuments, including the Maison Carreé and the Nîmes Arena. It became a Roman Colony sometime around 28 BC, and was known as the Colony of Nemausus. Caesar Augustus gave Nemausus ramparts of six kilometers that surrounded the city reinforced by fourteen towers. You will be seeing one of the the towers and one of the remaining gates.

An aqueduct, the Pont Du Gard was built to bring water from 20 kilometers to the North, and Nîmes is also home to one of the most well preserved Roman Temples called the Maison Carreé. The Arena was built at the end of the 2nd. century, and is considered the best preserved amphitheater in France. It is still used for bullfights and concerts in the present day. It has a capacity of 26,000. Because of the rich aforementioned heritage, Nîmes has been known as the French Rome.

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Just arrived and off to the park, and catch a few of the sights before the day is done.

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Les Jardins de la Fontaine

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The Temple of Diane

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Tour Magna – The Tower on the hill that showed Rome’s dominance in the world.

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The splendid view from the top of the tower. There are many more stairs than you would imagine, especially after the climb from the park below.

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A little entertainment before the twilight fashion show.

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Maison Carreé – Beautifully preserved and look at those beautiful Corinthian columns!

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Here’s a closer look at those capitals on the columns.

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Arènes – This is where gladiators fought 2,000 years ago.

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Here you can see the difference a little cleaning makes for an old monument.

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COLLISEUM – Most people don’t realize that there were many styles of gladiator, distinguished by their weaponry, shields, helmets, armor, etc.  Each used a particular strategy because of his equipment, and each was usually pitted against a gladiator using a different form of defenses and weapons. This turned the matches into very much of an art form rather than just another form of brutality.

The gladiators were often praised as heroes for giving up their free status, and living as a slave would while at the same time showing such bravery and sacrifice. As the Roman Empire declined, the games deteriorated into pure bloodsport and lost all of its prior glory. Unfortunately, Hollywood movies have done little to paint a real picture of the gladiatorial matches.

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These colosseums were the precursors of today’s stadium which because of their ingenious design could empty out in record time, and avoid any injury to the crowd.

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No selfie stick for me. I was doing selfies with film cameras twenty years ago.

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Meanwhile back at the house, Marcel lounges on the terrace.

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Now to the amazing structure that helped to supply Nimes with fresh water back in the day. The Romans really had this sort of thing worked out.

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Note the bridge section on the lower level. Bridge and water supply.

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French people enjoying a dip on a really hot day.

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Me hiking up hills getting hotter in order to get good shots with the sun on the aqueduct.

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This is where the water flowed at the top. I sure wish I had some.

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Back down the hill for the full monty.

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PONT DU GARD – A technical and artistic masterpiece, it is also the tallest aqueduct in the Roman world, and has been established as a Unesco World Heritage Site.

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Back in Nîmes at a delightful street fair.

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Wine aromatic training.

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Last night in town and the duck was sensational.

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I had to see this baby at night before I left town.

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The Shopping Street

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Danny’s favorite European store.

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Porte Auguste – One of the last two remaining gates to the Roman city. Middle arches for vehicles and outer arches for pedestrians.

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Maze of hay bales for a farming expo.

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LES MOUTONS

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A SHETLAND PONY

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An old steam engine for my brother Buell.

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One last look at the Colosseum.

Photo on 5-10-15 at 11.19 AM

 

 

 

4 Comments

  1. Jason B.
    June 10, 2015

    Green with envy! Damn you to hell T.Z. lol

  2. The Travel Zealot
    June 10, 2015

    Yeah Jason,
    Nimes is pretty cool.

  3. Jason B.
    June 12, 2015

    THAT LAST ROUND OF PICS WERE PHENOMENAL. WHAT ARE YOU USING?

  4. The Travel Zealot
    June 12, 2015

    Just a Sony RX100 series 3. It’s a compact that can actually fit in your pocket, but it has a great processor that makes it a semi pro camera. It can go fully manual, and even has a pop-up view finder in lieu of the led screen for tough to see sunny situations.I love it because it is inconspicuous, and I don’t have to lug around a monstrosity. Let’s face it, if you don’t take the camera with you, you don’t get the shot. My stuff isn’t as great as some of the blogs out there, but the difference isn’t all that noticeable. For the convenience and the reduced weight I carry in my pack, it’s worth it.

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